Hybrid schedule causes mixed reactions

Hybrid schedule causes mixed reactions

Matthew Rutherford
eSomthin Staff

There is no doubt about it — this school year is much different than usual.

Perrysburg Schools has tried to give a full school experience while still staying safe. This school year, Perrysburg Schools has decided to put the high school on a hybrid schedule where half the school will be in the building on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and the other half on Wednesdays and Fridays.

Mondays, the days that students are not at school, excluding weekends, are doing schoolwork online, otherwise known as remote work. This, as a result, adds a lot of responsibility to students, because they can now have two different schedules for weekdays, as they are in the building two days a week.

eSomthin sent a questionnaire out to the school asking students about their schedules and their work methods.

Disclaimer: There are about 1,500 students at Perrysburg High School. The survey was taken voluntarily by only 225 students. There were 73 freshmen, 53 sophomores, 56 juniors, and 42 seniors surveyed.

The first comparison is between what time students wake on an in-person school day vs. what time they wake up on a remote school day.

Answer statistics for a question asked for a survey
Students who took this survey were asked what time do they have to wake up on an in-person school day; this pie represents the percentages of people based on what time they choose to wake up on an in-person school day. (Photo credit: Matthew Rutherford)
Answer statistics for a question asked for a survey
Students who took this survey were asked what time do they have to wake up on a remote school day; this pie represents the percentages of people based on what time they choose to wake up on a remote school day. (Photo credit: Matthew Rutherford)

92.9%, or 209 students, wake up between 6 AM and 8 AM on in-person school days. This makes sense, as most students need to be in class at 8:30 AM. 55.6% or 125 students, wake up between 8 AM and 10 AM. This suggests that some Perrysburg High School students are on different sleep schedules depending on if the following day of school is an in-person school day or a remote school day.

Another question asked to students is roughly what time of day do they start remote work.

Answer statistics for a question asked for a survey
Students who took this survey were asked roughly what time do they start remote work; this pie represents the percentages of people based on what time they choose to start remote work. (Photo credit: Matthew Rutherford)

Based on these results, 66.5%, or 149 students, start their remote work between 9 AM and 2 PM, which means about a third of students who took this survey start their remote work during school hours. 19.2%, or 43 students, start their remote work between 7 AM or earlier and 9 AM. This might indicate that a part of Perrysburg High School students might want to get their remote school work done as early as possible, whether it be because they want to have more free time for the rest of day or they have something else going on later on in the day.

The final question asked to students was roughly how long did they spend on remote work.

Answer statistics for a question asked for a survey
Students who took this survey were asked how long do they spend on remote work in hours; this pie represents the percentages of people based on how long they spend on remote work. (Photo credit: Matthew Rutherford)

This pie is surprisingly evenly split. This shows that students have very different amounts of work, and how each student has very different work ethics. It is a small number, but 5.4% of students who took this survey, or 12 students, spend 7-8 or more hours on homework. This might raise concern for the amount of stress that those students might have.

These survey results may be eye-opening to some people. The results of this survey clearly show that students are on different schedules depending on if that school day is a remote day or in-person school day. On remote days, the majority of students wake up later than they do on in-person school days.

Other stories on eSomthin:

What do you think?
Share this Post

3 Comments

  1. I appreciate this story. Thanks for collecting some great data and analyzing it for us, Matthew.

    It is not surprising that students enjoy sleeping in on their remote days as opposed to being forced to wake up early on in-person days, but I wonder what the health implications of this are for students. I am going to have to do some research.

     
  2. Matthew this is AWESOME keep up the fantastic work!! – Aisha S.

     
  3. Great work on this Matthew! I like how many statistics you pointed out in this important topic during these times.

     

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>
*
*